Is Green the new Olive?   Leave a comment

Last Saturday, at exactly the same time as the controversial World Cup race in China (the one with the mass non-disqualification which denied us a first ever world cup victory), we had a League event at Ne’ot Kdumim with similar issues, but no controversy, apparently because no-one cares enough about the results – which says something about our ranking system.

Basically, it was a sprint race on non-urban terrain, and the organisers decided that the new ISSOM 2019 standard was to be used. The main issue there is that the 100% green colour is now defined as impassable (and forbidden to cross), and there is no 100% green/50% black as before.

This map has lots of green, mostly thick bushes in open, rocky terrain, and mostly passable if you’re stubborn enough. Despite the fact that the rules were made clear on both the website and the noticeboard at the event, most orienteers that I talked to after the race didn’t have a clue that they weren’t allowed to pass through the green, and had done so at some point. In addition to this, many edges of the bushes are vague enough, so you don’t really know if you’re in the forbidden area or not.

I had an almost perfect race and enjoyed it, finishing 4th in H40. I’m not complaining, but there are some issues here:

  1. The new mapping standard doesn’t cover many types of “green” vegetation. Technically, most of the bushes on the map should now be 60% green, but that doesn’t represent the reality on the ground.
  2. There is a divergence between the regular orienteering mapping standard and sprint orienteering, which is going to cause lots of confusion.
  3. Organisers should make sure that the rules are applicable on the maps they use.20191026_NeotKdumim_Route

The previous weekend we really kicked off the forest season, with two events hosted by my club, which I enjoyed much more despite some really tough climbing. I ran the first one at Bar’am properly, and the second one at Amuka the day after, with no control flags, using Roni’s map – which is why my track misses controls 4-5 (I knew I hadn’t found them exactly, but couldn’t be bothered to go back and make sure).

The one in the family who’s participating in all the events is Alon, on the children’s course. He’s slowly improving and can finish a sprint course with minimal intervention, but needs some more help in the forest. Following him is always fun.

20191018_Baram_Route

Bar’am

20191019_Amuka_Route

Amuka

 

Posted 02/11/2019 by dchissick in Uncategorized

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